Last revision of this page: 20 October 2012.
Be patient, the page with all its embedded png images weighs about 5 MB...


A LaTeX package: mathastext
Copyright © 2011, 2012 Jean-François Burnol.

mathastext is a package to allow to use the text font also in mathematics mode, thus giving a very unified look to the produced document. As a side-effect it alleviates somewhat the problem of the scarcity of free math fonts for TeX typesetting . . . (back to mathastext.html).

Download from a CTAN location

Examples:
png images (100 dpi) in this page...

...and as pdf files
Further examples
     (latex+dvipng or xelatex+gs)
     (dvipdfmx/xelatex)
     (latex+dvipng and mainly latex+dvips+gs)
  1. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  2. Fourier Utopia
  3. Droid Serif
  4. Droid Sans
  5. New Century Schoolbook
  6. French Cursive
  7. Auriocus Kalligraphicus
  8. Emerald Skeetch
  9. Avant Garde
  10. Zapf Chancery
  11. GFS Bodoni
  12. Palatino
  13. New Century Schoolbook
  14. Epigrafica
  15. GFS NeoHellenic
  16. Comfortaa
  17. SliTeX
  18. Antykwa Półtawskiego
  19. Baskervald ADF
  20. Libertine
  21. Biolinum
  22. Minion/Myriad Pro
  23. Minion Pro
  24. GNU FreeSerif/FreeSans
  25. GNU FreeSerif
  26. Libris ADF
  27. Vollkorn
  28. BrushScriptX-Italic
  29. Emerald Tall Paul
  30. Emerald Augie
  31. Emerald JD
  32. Emerald Webster
  33. Comic Sans MS
  34. Electrum ADF
  35. American Typewriter
  36. Papyrus
  37. Noteworthy Light
  38. Chalkboard SE
  39. Chalkduster
  40. Apple Chancery
  41. Zapf Chancery
  42. Vollkorn
  43. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  44. Times
  45. Helvetica
  46. Venturis ADF
  47. Romande ADF
  48. GFS Didot
  49. Droid Serif
  50. Droid Sans
  51. Verdana
  52. Baskerville
PDF files with some pages as PNG images in this page:
  1. French Cursive (see the warning)
  2. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  3. Electrum
  4. Droid Serif and Sans
  5. Libertine and Biolinum
  6. TX Typewriter


PDF only examples:
  1. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  2. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  3. New Century Schoolbook
  4. Zapf Chancery
  5. French Cursive (see the warning)
  6. Auriocus Kalligraphicus
  7. Skeetch
  8. Avant Garde
  9. Fourier Utopia
  10. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional
  11. Zapf Chancery
  12. French Cursive (see the warning)
  13. Auriocus Kalligraphicus
  14. Skeetch
  15. Avant Garde
  16. Fourier Utopia
  17. Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional

All fonts(1) are freely available (the LaTeX Font Catalogue is a very useful resource), most of them being already included in the standard TeX distributions or downloadable as ready-made packages from CTAN. In one instance (Vollkorn) the fonts were available as ttf files, and were installed for LaTeX using the otfinst script.

(1) most of the xelatex's examples are with fonts provided with the system on a mac os x machine, some use opentype fonts included in the TeXLive distribution, and two examples use opentype fonts bundled inside a freely distributed PDF viewer.

The examples numbered 42-52 illustrate the italic option of the package. However, when using italic letters in math mode, their protruding characteristics (most notable in the case of the letter `f') often lead to overlapping problems with delimiters or other symbols (the math italic fonts reestablish sufficient kerning around letters compared to text italic). This is one reason why most examples here are with upright letters. The other reason being that the author believes that using upright letters in math mode is esthetically more pleasing.(2) There is no reason to have such a contrast as has been practiced in scientific typography (and re-inforced as the "no way to do otherwise" de facto default for the TeX users of the last three decades) between the text and the formulas, because the text is a formula in its own right (and vice versa). And this remark is particularly valid for the italic shape, whose application is inconsistent (to the point that there are battles of «experts» about whether the `d' in `dx' should be upright or slanted, that the `x' is slanted is anyhow accepted as a definitive axiom.)

(2) it seems that it is only during the last few years, as a result of the widespread use of the beamer package that scientific users of TeX have discovered that math could be displayed in other fonts than the defaults, in that case in sans serif! (but again they now all use the same fonts...)

Regarding the large mathematical symbols (sums, products, integrals), nothing is done by the package. The examples in this page are either with the default Computer Modern fonts, or the Fourier-GUTenberg fonts, or the PX/TX fonts. In alphabetical order, some of the packages (that I have either looked at or heard about) providing access to math fonts (either alongside text fonts, or designed to match a pre-existing typeface): anttor, arev, ccfonts, cmbright, concmath, fourier, iwona, kpfonts, kurier, mathdesign (garamond, charter, utopia), mathpazo, mathtime, mathptmx, mbtimes, ncfourier, newtx, pxfonts, txfonts,...  The differences for some among these packages are not in the math symbols but only in the (Greek and Latin) letters in math mode. Some links:

Go to the bottom for a (partial!) discussion of Greek letters, as have been used on the present page.

The XeTeX examples are provided just to show that mathastext is Unicode compatible, but let's recall that it is only concerned with a tiny Basic Latin subrange of the Unicode glyphs; mathspec and unicode-math are packages specially tailored to Unicode and you should look at them first.

mathastext can accomodate many math-as-text fonts in the same document. This is illustrated by this (very special...) example. The preamble of the LaTeX source is here.

Regarding this web page: the png images were converted from dvi files with the help of dvipng (it turns out the outcome is at 100dpi, so they will show in your browser at their real size only if your screen device has a 100dpi resolution), and from pdf files with gs (with -r500 -dDownScaleFactor=5 to get 100 pixels per inch of the original contents). The pdf files in the middle column above were produced via latex+dvipdfmx (some with latex+dvips+gs), or via xelatex. Earlier, most had been done via pdflatex (probably because it had been easier for me to do pdflatex rather than latex+dvips+gs simultaneously on dozens of files), but on 2012/10/07, I re-did them with dvipdfmx, which gave impressive size gains (indeed dvipdfmx has a compressed embedding of fonts): typically a ratio of 1 to 4, and in the case of Libertine/Biolinum, an improvement of 1 to 10! as the fonts may have changed, I re-did a pdflatex to double-check. In some cases, the pdf viewer complained of not being able to display the embedded font glyphs and I had to do dvips+gs in those cases rather than dvipdfmx.

In the first few images below, the symbols which do not match the other letters are not from the text font (mathastext does nothing for things such as \partial or \nabla or \ell or \wp). Everything following the math excerpt (the abc...z ABC...Z line for example) is typeset in math mode. The digits are in the .tex file given as $0\,1\,2\,3\,4\,5\,6\,7\,8\,9$, hence the spacings. In some instances the ``no dot j'' is absent from the font and appears as a black rectangle.




Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[variablett]{lmodern}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{\ttdefault}
\usepackage[LGRgreek]{mathastext}
\MTgreekfont{lmtt} % no lgr lmvtt, so use lgr lmtt
\Mathastext
\let\varepsilon\epsilon % only \varsigma in LGR
Typeset with mathastext 1.15c (2012/10/05). pdf
Note for experts: t1lmvtt.fd has some typos affecting the `light' series in italic shape and the `semi-bold' series (last checked 2012/10/07).


lmvtt-31.png
In the next image, one uses for the text the `light' variant (option `lighttt'
of package lmodern, but see the `note to experts' above)
and the math mode uses the semi-bold series of lmvtt.
lagrange-mt3t.png




Fourier Utopia (Fourier upright Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[upright]{fourier}
\usepackage{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


fourier-31.png




Droid Serif

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[default]{droidserif}
\usepackage[LGRgreek]{mathastext}
\let\varepsilon\epsilon
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


droidserif-31.png




Droid Sans

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[default]{droidsans}
\usepackage[LGRgreek]{mathastext}
\let\varepsilon\epsilon
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


droidsans-31.png




New Century Schoolbook (Symbol Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{newcent}
\usepackage[symbolgreek]{mathastext}
\linespread{1.1}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


newcent-31.png




French Cursive (Euler Greek)
Note that there are no plus, no equal and no asterisk signs. The following warning seems to be obsolete with the latest version of the font (quickly tested 2012/12/30).
Obsolete warning: when mathastext is used with French Cursive, certain isolated letters, like the f in the example below will not display correctly in math mode. This is particularly notable on the letters r and s, which become barely legible. This happens for letters at the beginning of a word: in $rs$, s will be ok, but not r. If you really want to use mathastext with French Cursive, try to avoid r and s in math mode. If you absolutely need to use these letters at a few spots in your document, you can type \text{r} or rather \text{rs} in the example above (this requires amstext (or amsmath)). Also, note that there are no plus, no equal and no asterisk signs (at least in my copy of the fonts).
This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[default]{frcursive}
\usepackage[eulergreek,noplusnominus,noequal,nohbar,%
nolessnomore,noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


frcursive-31.png
logexp-frcursive2t.png




Auriocus Kalligraphicus (Symbol Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{aurical}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{AuriocusKalligraphicus}
\usepackage[symbolgreek]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


auriocus-31.png




ECF Skeetch (CM Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\DeclareFontFamily{T1}{fsk}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{fsk}{m}{n}{<->s*[1.315] fskmw8t}{}
\renewcommand\rmdefault{fsk}
\usepackage[noendash,defaultmathsizes,nohbar,defaultimath]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


skeetch-31.png




URW Avant Garde (Symbol Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{avant}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\sfdefault}
\usepackage[symbolgreek,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


avant-31.png




URW Zapf Chancery (CM Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\DeclareFontFamily{T1}{pzc}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{mb}{it}{<->s*[1.2] pzcmi8t}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{m}{it}{<->ssub * pzc/mb/it}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{mb}{sl}{<->ssub * pzc/mb/it}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{m}{sl}{<->ssub * pzc/mb/sl}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{m}{n}{<->ssub * pzc/mb/it}{}
\usepackage{chancery}
\usepackage{mathastext}
\linespread{1.05}
\begin{document}\boldmath
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


chancery-31.png




GFS Bodoni

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{bodoni}
\usepackage[LGRgreek]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
\linespread{1.06}
Typeset with mathastext 1.14c (2011/04/04). pdf


bodoni-42.pngbodoni-43.png




Palatino (Symbol Greek)

This example uses Palatino (URW++ Palladio) for text and math, and Symbol for the Greek letters and various mathematical symbols. The large mathematical symbols are the default ones.
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{palatino}
\usepackage[symbolmax,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13b (2011/03/15). pdf


palatino-42.pngpalatino-43.png




New Century Schoolbook (Symbol Greek, PX math symbols)

This example uses New Century SchoolBook for the Latin letters and punctuation characters in text and math, Symbol for the Greek letters, and PX Fonts for the mathematical symbols.
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
\usepackage{newcent}
\usepackage[symbolgreek,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\linespread{1.06}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13b (2011/03/15). pdf


newcent-42.pngnewcent-43.png




Epigrafica

This example uses Epigrafica for Latin and Greek letters. The math symbols are from the PX fonts (epigrafica loads the pxfonts package).
\usepackage[LGR,OT1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{epigrafica}
\usepackage[basic,LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
\linespread{1.2}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15c (2012/10/05). pdf


epigrafica-42.pngepigrafica-43.png




GFS NeoHellenic

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{neohellenic}
\usepackage[LGRgreek]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
\linespread{1.06}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


neohellenic-42.pngneohellenic-43.png




Comfortaa

This example uses:
\usepackage[default]{comfortaa}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
\linespread{1.06}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


comfortaa-42.pngcomfortaa-43.png




SliTeX (Euler Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{tpslifonts}
\usepackage[eulergreek,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\MTEulerScale{1.06}
\linespread{1.2}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


slitex-42.pngslitex-43.png




Antykwa Półtawskiego (TX Fonts for Greek and math symbols)

This example uses:
\usepackage[OT4,OT1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[upright]{txgreeks}
\usepackage{antpolt}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,nolessnomore]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13b (2011/03/15). pdf


antpolt-42.pngantpolt-43.png




Baskervald ADF with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage[upright]{fourier}
\usepackage{baskervald}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


baskervald-42.pngbaskervald-43.png




Libertine

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{libertine}
\usepackage[greek=n]{libgreek}
\usepackage[noasterisk,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


libertine-42.pnglibertine-43.png




Biolinum

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{libertine}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\sfdefault}
\usepackage[greek=n,biolinum]{libgreek}
\usepackage[noasterisk,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


biolinum-42.pngbiolinum-43.png




Minion Pro and Myriad Pro (and TX fonts symbols)

This example uses Minion Pro for text, Myriad Pro for math, and TX fonts for math symbols (Greek inclusive).
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[upright]{txgreeks}
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Minion Pro}
\setsansfont[Mapping=tex-text,Scale=MatchUppercase]{Myriad Pro}
\renewcommand\familydefault\sfdefault
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\renewcommand\familydefault\rmdefault
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


minionmyriad-42.pngminionmyriad-43.png




Minion Pro (and TX fonts symbols)

This example uses Minion Pro and TX fonts for math symbols.
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Minion Pro}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


minionpro-52.pngminionpro-53.png




GNU FreeSerif and FreeSans

This example is set up in GNU FreeFont Serif for the text, GNU FreeFont Sans for the letters in math mode, Latin Modern Sans for the Greek letters, and Computer Modern for the large symbols and delimiters.
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[ExternalLocation, 
             Mapping=tex-text,
             BoldFont=FreeSerifBold,
             ItalicFont=FreeSerifItalic,
             BoldItalicFont=FreeSerifBoldItalic]{FreeSerif}
\setsansfont[ExternalLocation, 
             Mapping=tex-text,
             BoldFont=FreeSansBold,
             ItalicFont=FreeSansOblique,
             BoldItalicFont=FreeSansBoldOblique,
             Scale=MatchLowercase]{FreeSans}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{lmss}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\sfdefault}
\Mathastext
\let\varphi\phi % no `var' phi in LGR encoding
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\rmdefault}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


gnufree-42.pnggnufree-43.png




GNU FreeSerif (and TX fonts symbols)

This example is set up in GNU FreeFont Serif with TX fonts symbols and delimiters.
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\usepackage{txfonts}  %\let\mathbb=\varmathbb
\setmainfont[ExternalLocation, 
             Mapping=tex-text,
             BoldFont=FreeSerifBold,
             ItalicFont=FreeSerifItalic,
             BoldItalicFont=FreeSerifBoldItalic]{FreeSerif}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


gnufree-52.pnggnufree-53.png




Libris ADF with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[upright]{fourier}
\usepackage{libris}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\sfdefault}
\usepackage[noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


libris-42.pnglibris-43.png




Vollkorn (TX fonts for Greek and math symbols)

This example uses Vollkorn for the Latin letters and punctuation characters in text and math, and the TX fonts for the Greek letters (in upright shape) and the mathematical symbols.
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[upright]{txgreeks}
\usepackage{vollkorn}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13b (2011/03/15). pdf


vollkorn-42.pngvollkorn-43.png




BrushScriptX-Italic (PX math and Greek)

This example uses BrushScriptX-Italic for Latin letters in text and math, and PX Fonts for math symbols and Greek letters.
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
%\usepackage{pbsi}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{pbsi}
\renewcommand{\mddefault}{xl}
\renewcommand{\bfdefault}{xl}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
\begin{document}\boldmath
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


brushscriptX-42.pngbrushscriptX-43.png




ECF Tall Paul (with Symbol font)

This example is set up in ECF Tall Paul (with Symbol font).
\DeclareFontFamily{T1}{ftp}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{ftp}{m}{n}{
   <->s*[1.4] ftpmw8t
}{} % increase size by factor 1.4
\renewcommand\familydefault{ftp} % emerald package
\usepackage[symbol]{mathastext}
\let\infty\inftypsy
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf


emerald-tallpaul-42.pngemerald-tallpaul-43.png




ECF Augie (Euler Greek)

This example is set up in ECF Augie. It uses:
\renewcommand\familydefault{fau} % emerald package
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,eulergreek]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15c (2012/10/05). pdf


emerald-augie-42.pngemerald-augie-43.png




ECF JD (with TX fonts)

This example is set up in ECF JD (with bold TX fonts). It uses:
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[upright]{txgreeks}
\renewcommand\familydefault{fjd} % emerald package
\usepackage{mathastext}
\begin{document}\mathversion{bold}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15c (2012/10/05). pdf


emerald-JD-42.pngemerald-JD-43.png




ECF Webster (with TX fonts)

This example is set up in ECF Webster (with bold TX fonts). It uses:
\usepackage{txfonts}
\usepackage[upright]{txgreeks}
\renewcommand\familydefault{fwb} % emerald package
\usepackage{mathastext}
\renewcommand{\int}{\intop\limits}
\linespread{1.5}
\begin{document}\mathversion{bold}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15c (2012/10/05). pdf


emerald-webster-42.pngemerald-webster-43.png




Comic Sans MS

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Comic Sans MS}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13).pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX on Mac OS X; png images produced with gs)


comicsans-52.pngcomicsans-53.png




Electrum ADF (CM Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,basic,defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\usepackage[lf]{electrum}
\Mathastext
\let\varphi\phi
Typeset with mathastext 1.15b (2012/09/27). pdf


electrum-42.pngelectrum-43.png




American Typewriter

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{American Typewriter}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


americantypewriter-52.pngamericantypewriter-53.png




Papyrus

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Papyrus}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


papyrus-52.pngpapyrus-53.png




Noteworthy Light

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Noteworthy Light}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


noteworthylight-52.pngnoteworthylight-53.png




Chalkboard SE

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Chalkboard SE}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


chalkboardse-52.pngchalkboardse-53.png




Chalkduster

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Chalkduster}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


chalkduster-52.pngchalkduster-53.png




Apple Chancery

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Apple Chancery}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


applechancery-52.pngapplechancery-53.png




Zapf Chancery

This example uses:
\DeclareFontFamily{T1}{pzc}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{mb}{it}{<->s*[1.2] pzcmi8t}{}
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{pzc}{m}{it}{<->ssub * pzc/mb/it}{}
\usepackage{chancery} % = \renewcommand{\rmdefault}{pzc}
\renewcommand\shapedefault\itdefault
\renewcommand\bfdefault\mddefault
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes]{mathastext}
\linespread{1.05}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/10/13). pdf


zapfchancery-52.pngzapfchancery-53.png



EXAMPLES WITH THE ITALIC OPTION




Vollkorn with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage{fourier}
\usepackage{vollkorn}
\usepackage[italic,nohbar]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.12b (2011/02/09). pdf


vollkorn-31.png




Latin Modern Typewriter Proportional (CM Greek)

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[variablett,nomath]{lmodern}
\renewcommand{\familydefault}{\ttdefault}
\usepackage[frenchmath]{mathastext}
\linespread{1.08}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


lmvtt-42.pnglmvtt-43.png




Times with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage{fourier}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{ptm}
\usepackage[italic,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


times-42.pngtimes-43.png




Helvetica with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[scaled]{helvet}
\usepackage{fourier}
\renewcommand{\rmdefault}{phv}
\usepackage[italic,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


helvetica-42.pnghelvetica-43.png




Venturis ADF with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage{fourier}
\usepackage[lf]{venturis}
\usepackage[italic,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


venturis-ADF-42.pngventuris-ADF-43.png




Romande ADF with Fourier

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{fourier}
\usepackage{romande}
\usepackage[italic,defaultmathsizes,noasterisk]{mathastext}
\renewcommand{\itshape}{\swashstyle}
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


romande-42.pngromande-43.png




GFS Didot

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\renewcommand\rmdefault{udidot}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes,italic]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


gfsdidot-42.pnggfsdidot-43.png




Droid Serif (PX math symbols)

This example uses Droid Serif for text (Latin letters) and math (Latin and Greek letters), and PX Fonts for math symbols.
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
\usepackage[default]{droidserif}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes,italic,basic]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf
See below for an example where Droid Serif is used for the text and Droid Sans for the math.


droidserif-42.pngdroidserif-43.png




Droid Sans

This example uses:
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[default]{droidsans}
\usepackage[LGRgreek,defaultmathsizes,italic]{mathastext}
\let\varphi\phi
Typeset with mathastext 1.13 (2011/03/11). pdf


droidsans-42.pngdroidsans-43.png




Verdana

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Verdana}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,italic]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/05/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


verdana-52.pngverdana-53.png




Baskerville

This example uses:
\usepackage[no-math]{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Mapping=tex-text]{Baskerville}
\usepackage[defaultmathsizes,italic]{mathastext}
Typeset with mathastext 1.15d (2012/05/13). pdf
  (compiled with XeLaTeX)


baskerville-52.pngbaskerville-53.png





Various possibilities for the Greek letters

This section was written in March 2011, and I added a little to the discussion of the LGR encoded fonts for this current version of October 2012. The tables have been extended with the LGR encoded CM fonts, serif, sans and typewriter (part of the cbfonts).

The Greek letters can be either set up by other packages (such as eulervm, fourier, kpfonts, mathdesign, pxfonts, txfonts, ... in brief, any package setting up math fonts) or decided by an option passed to mathastext: LGRgreek, symbolgreek, eulergreek, selfGreek (the eleven uppercase Greek letters in OT1-encoding).

In the examples presented here, the Greek letters in math mode may be:

comparegrec21.png

On each line lowercase and uppercase Greek letters are taken from the same font. But as TeX defaults to upright uppercase and italic lowercase, typically this will also be the default set-up when loading a package providing math fonts (for example \usepackage{fourier}), except of course for Euler and Symbol which do not exist in slanted shape. The author's packages libgreek, txgreeks, and pxgreeks facilitate the shape selection when using, respectively, Libertine/Biolinum or the TX/PX fonts.

To conclude, a table with these fonts in Bold series (sometimes the bold series is like the medium series). The Libertine Bold Italic misses the Greek glyphs (this issue arose when the libertine package, now called libertine-legacy, entered into its version number 5; note that these tables use the font files for (pdf)latex of libertine-legacy, not the opentype font files now distributed with the package libertineotf). But the slanted shape glyphs do exist.

comparegrec22.png

A PDF file including the above figures and text.



PDF Documentation of the initial version.

top

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional